The mother die used for postal stationery cliches

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© Lars Engelbrecht

 

 

 


POSTMARKS

 

THE DIFFERENT POSTMARKS

In the period of the bi-coloured postal stationery (1871-1905) a lot of different types of postmarks were used in Denmark. Here the different types are shown:

Mute postmark. Very rare on bicoloured postal stationery.
Number postmark. Very common postmark for cancelling. Each number indicates a city (Copenhagen is #1). Numbers up to 286 were used untill 1884.
Combined postmark. Postmarks with the number postmark and circular postmark combined in one.
"Esrom" postmark. Postmarks with city names (or contractions). 
Footpost postmark. Used untill 1876 by the Copenhagen Foot Post (F.P. = Foot Post). Both blue and black postmarkings are common as sidemarks, and is rarely used as cancel postmark.
Oval railway postmark. Used by the railways. Rare as cancel postmark.
Rubber postmark. Also known with small numbers in the middle.
Antiqva postmark. Used as cancel and side postmark. Replaced by Lapidar postmarks. Fo is short for "Formiddag" = morning. Ef is short for "Eftermiddag" = afternoon.
Lapidar postmark. Very common side and cancel postmark. "Tog" means train. 
Line postmark. A few line postmarks are not unusual, but most are.
Star postmark. Used in many small towns. Different stars and without star.
Arrival postmark. Used in Copenhagen. K is a district in Copenhagen
Arrival postmark. Used in Copenhagen. OMB is short for "Ombæring" = delivery.
Bridge/Swiss type postmark. Replaced Lapidar postmarks. 

 

POSTMARK

Box containing postmark with replaceable numbers for dates. 

Used in the period of bi-coloured postal stationery.

MAILBOX

Mailbox from around the end of 19th century, and has therefore probably contained many bicoloured postal stationery.

 

LINKS

If you are interested in Danish postmarks, I suggest you look at the website of The Danish Postal History Society

 

© Copyright 2003-2004 Lars Engelbrecht. All Rights Reserved

 Last updated: 3 August 2004